Candace Cameron Bure Reveals the Secret of Her 22-Year Marriage: ‘The Bible Is the Foundation for Us’

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Candace Cameron Bure says Jesus Christ is the glue that holds her marriage and family together.  

In a recent interview with PEOPLE magazine, Bure talks about her 22-year marriage to Valeri Bure and how they make it a point to find opportunities to spend some time away from their children and their life in Los Angeles.

“I just came back from Switzerland two days ago with my husband,” she told PEOPLE . “We had a little five-day vacation, so that was wonderful. We do like to travel and get away from everything here at home in L.A., and from our kids, as much as we love them. We want alone time, you know what I mean? And our kids are older, too.”

Bure, 41, admits their faith in Jesus Christ is what holds her marriage and their family together.

“The reality is the glue for us is Jesus,” she told the magazine. “It’s the Bible. You know, when there are arguments or we’re compromising and in ways, it’s always like, ‘Well, let’s just go back to the Bible.’ It’s the foundation for us. So it’s not about winning or losing but doing this journey together.”

Bure and her husband love spending time with their daughter, Natasha, 19, and sons Lev, 18, and Maksim, 16.  As parents, the Bures believe in being supportive, but also of having a close relationship with each child.

“It’s so important to engage with your kids constantly. I talk with them nonstop from really kind of intense and deep conversations to the fluffy stuff and the day-to-day,” she said. “But it’s important to let them know that you’re there for them no matter what.”

“As a mom, I’m always going to have an opinion, but not in a judgmental way, if that makes sense,” she continued. “I’m going to give my best advice as a mother, or my husband as a father. But we want to be open enough that they don’t feel scared to be able to talk to us.”

The actress admits her children are growing up in a time very different than when she was a teenager.  She admits social media and the internet have made the world a smaller place.  

 “When I was 16, I had to actually travel to Spain to really understand what went on in Spain,” she told PEOPLE. “Sure, I could read an encyclopedia or a textbook, but I didn’t have immediate access. Our children do. It’s very different. I think they’re exposed to so much more now than when I was a teenager. And some of that is for good, and some of that is not for the best.”

For more information about Bure and her ministry, visit her website. 

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